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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,681 (some duplicates have been removed)
the moscone children, of literally living with george moscone for so many years. mr. mayor, it was when we were in law school together, we were fellow janitors at hastings college of law. george moscone was amazing. he was just as aggressive about inclusionary activities. he was just as focused on sharing. and he had an immense pride in the city and county of san francisco like no other. i suspect that much of my love of the city comes from my exposure to george in those very early years. george went through a considerable amount of evolutionary process politically. he allowed john burton to talk him into running for the state legislature. an unsuccessful effort for the state assembly. he went on to become, obviously, a supervisor in the city and county of san francisco. and in those days it was a different city. it was dramatically different. there was no such thing as a so-called progressive, david campos. there was no such thing as somebody in that category. george moscone, philip burton, represented that which we all now richly enjoy. george went on to become a state senator. and in th
i suspect that much of my love of the city comes from my exposure to george in those very early years. george went through a considerable amount of evolutionary process politically. he allowed john burton to talk him into running for the state legislature. an unsuccessful effort for the state assembly. he went on to become, obviously, a supervisor in the city and county of san francisco. and in those days it was a different city. it was dramatically different. there was no such thing as a so-called progressive, david campos. there was no such thing as somebody in that category. george moscone, philip burton, represented that which we all now richly enjoy. george went on to become a state senator. and in that capacity, scott, it was george moscone who shepherded the bill that removed criminal penalties between consenting adults in this state that cost people their positions as teachers, as doctors, as nurses, as lawyers in those days. it was a bill that we orchestrated together. and george did what has never been done since, and that is cause the senate to hookup in a 20 to 20 ti
and mayor george moscone who were brutally assassinated decades ago. and we gather every year to remember, and not just to remember and to mourn, but also to remember the positives and to remember frankly both of these great men and what they contributed to our community. you know, with respect to harvey milk, there will never, ever be another harvey milk in our community in terms of what he represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years
extraordinary people, one whom i knew almost as well as i know my own brother, and that was george. and the other whom i worked with just as if he was my brother in the things that we were able to achieve together. and, so, tonight, san francisco, it's not a time to be sad. it is a time to celebrate because you are the beneficiaries of an incredible productive team that has caused san francisco to be what it is. when carol migden and the troops stepped up and said, "let's do the whole business of domestic partners," and we did it on the steps of the rotunda, that was george and harvey doing that, not us. that was george and harvey doing that. (applause) >> and when mayor newsome called the whole world to look for a second time when he said, "people should be able to marry anybody whom they love," that was moscone and milk. literally being channeled through mr. newsome to do what caused san francisco to become the center piece of all aspects of openness, all aspects of what this nation should be about. and i tell you in celebrating, just on your own, think about your experience in s
and ann asked me to talk a bit on the day that marks the death of george and harvey. and the reason became clear when i sat down to write my words. i'm exhausted by talking about death. i know that's not the subject of today's memorial, but it always happens on the day that george and harvey were shot. and i think i'm tired of remembering them on the worst day of their lives. i wonder that if indeed there is a heaven, and if george and harvey got in, or perhaps they made it to somewhere a little more hip, a little more happening. they might be sitting up there on november 27th of every year and think, oh, lord, not this again. i mean, it's hard for me to imagine that this would be the day that george moscone and harvey milk would want to remember each and every year. don't get me wrong. i'm deeply touched that people remember my father and i do speak for my family in this regard. we are always and every day grateful that we live in a city that does not forget. but there's just something wrong in this notion that the day we remember our lost leaders is the most violent day of their lives, w
of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about linking -- lincoln or washington probably has been written. the rate historians whose figures point to pouring through the letters and the evidence of a book on i can or the hundreds of books on washington. my thought was, why not look at that person in it than the best, the first ladies? historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as they have largely ignored the role of -- in shaping the man. i suspect a lot of my colleagues tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians most historians is that we say were not educated in matters of the heart. so therefore canon's crowns and kings are what folks focus on. in setting the first lady's for example the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days on the south side of philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he missed her. she was pregnant and she had a miscarriage. he missed her and he boug
trafficking, and bringing victims a message of hope. >> george: as nigeria's christians suffer more attacks, the international community seeks more tools to fight islamic terrorist. hello, everyone, i'm george thomas. >> wendy: and i'm we wendy griffith. twin car bombings on a military base in nigeria killed at least 15 people. it happened in the muslim north. officials say a bus packed with explosives rammed into st. andrew military protestant church right after sunday's services. about 10 minutes later, a car just outside the church exploded, as people fled from the first attack. boko haram is expected in the attack. boko haram is blamed for killing more than 760 nigerians this year alone. >> george: staggering numbers. he is executive director of a group that defends religious rights. ann, the international criminal court has released a court that boko haram has, in fact, committed crimes against humanity. what does that mean for nigeria and its christians? >> the christians in nigeria have made an effort in recent years to request that the international criminal court find that the boko
, a bust that i have to admit captured george's mile wide grin and dramatically imperfect teeth, i saw on the pedestal so many things that i didn't know were there. i saw the names of my brothers and sister inside a heart, my dad's favorite movie, quotes by him how much he considered being mayor, honor bestowed on him, and the things made possible for people who didn't have power, who didn't have voice, there was so much more on that pedestal than death. and, so, i think it's time to reclaim george moscone from the narcissistic legacy or the senselessness of dan white or the well intentioned world of hollywood or the better intentioned world of theater. it's time to reclaim him from the places where the real george gets lost in the story of others, even in my own. and we gift him back to the city and to the people, to his friends and to his colleagues and to the citizens who are the fabric and texture and color of san francisco. so, all of us can stop looking at the death of george moscone and start to put him firmly in our hearts so we can see the likes of him in new community leaders
that george did, cocky and sexy, cruel as all get out. and then the song ends. and i notice the woman sitting next to me crying. and after the play is over, after the standing ovation of tony's brave and beautiful play, as people start to leave the theater, this woman, she remains in her chair and it seems she cannot move. i gently asked her if she's all right. and she nods. and she says without looking at me because she couldn't look at me, "i got to see my mayor again." so, maybe through art we can see again. about a month ago i braved going to the sf moment to check out the infamous bust of my dad and all i could remember growing up were the images of that controversial pedestal of gunshots and twinkies and don't think i didn't smile when i heard hostess went under. [laughter] (applause) but when i went to see the bust for that first time, a bust that i have to admit captured george's mile wide grin and dramatically imperfect teeth, i saw on the pedestal so many things that i didn't know were there. i saw the names of my brothers and sister inside a heart, my dad's favorite movie, quotes b
or the important impression, george washington was probably what people to think of him as. enormously impressive in a lot of ways, he was very careful in a lot of what he did to cultivate that image. he was not very effective militarily. in the middle of 1776 when the british invaded, and made a number of mistakes. the rest of the time he was very good. sam adams, i have an enormous amount of respect for. he burned a lot of records that might have told us more about him, but i think he seemed a lot of things really. i think, for example, you know what happened at lexington and concord before happened, that the british fired first. i think, probably they did but maybe they didn't. sam adams schemed all kinds of things out brilliantly. it would take me a documentary series of four to describe everything he did and how acute it was and how far ahead that man must have thought. so i had a great sense of his skills and ability. the other one that always fascinated me was the british commander sir william howell. his family was very interesting, because his mother was the illegitimate daughter of geor
interesting. if you think interesting in were thesignificant important impression, george washington was probably people think of him as, enormously impressive in a lot of ways. he was very careful in what he did to crate that image. -- to create that image. he made a number of mistakes. the rest of the time, he was very good. sam adams, i have enormous respect for him. he burned a lot of records that might have told us more about him. but i think he seemed a lot of things brilliantly. i think, for example, he knew what happened at lexington and concord before anyone. sam adams schemed all kinds of things out brilliantly. it would take me a documentary and a series of four books to describe everything he did and how far ahead that man must have fought. thought. must have flocke sir william howe, his family was very interesting. his mother was the limit -- was the illegitimate child of george .he first appeare georgia guston's was a brigadier in the british army. he was a here reahero to the co. he was democratic. he did not wear the red color. he had things that were not as easy to s
marriage. we'll break it all down with george will, james carville and mary matalin. paul krugman of the "new york times" and abc's own matthew dowd . >>> hello, again, just over three weeks away from that fiscal cliff, we just come off a week of press conferences, symbolic votes in senate, but less than an hour of serious negotiating. what will it take to break the stalemate? we'll get into that this morning, with two big roundtables of elected officials and experts. let's begin with the lawmakers. senator tom coburn for the republicans and debbie stabenow for the democrats. and congressman hensarlingg. the president said that for there to be a big deal, tax rates on the wealthy are going to have to go up. if that's his bottom line, can there be a deal? >> again, as the speaker has said, unfortunately what we see out of the president is my way or the highway. one dollar revenue for 2.5 of spending reductions. now, after the election, it's a little bit of bait and switch. now he's asking for $1.6 trillion. and if you look closely, for every one dollar of tax increase there's about
their first public performance on the night that harvey and george were taken from us. but mayor brown called them two extraordinary individuals. actually, mayor brown shared that with me four years ago. it has stayed with me. harvey and george, they put in place, as the mayor said, a foundation of what we see today in equality and justice. we actually live in an extraordinary time because of the shoulders created by george and harvey. we live in an extraordinary moment because each of you believe you're worthy because each of you have a gift of authenticity to offer the world. and each of you are here tonight with not only the moscone and milk family, but the true meaning of the human family, in remembrance of the sacrifices that have taken us to get us here and as a sacred reminder not to forget and not to go back. supervisor ammiano very brilliantly brought up harvey was tremendously impacted by world war ii. i wear his class ring from high school. he graduated in 1947, just a couple years after the end of world war ii. he could never understand how communities could turn on themselves. an
george's county. he was 14 years old and he was shot early this morning in louisdale. pat collins is live at the police headquarters where they're trying to piece together exactly what happened. pat? >> reporter: wendy, a 14-year-old hanging out with gang members ends up dead, shot and killed in a drive-by. the victim, eliez reyes. he goes by the name of cheche. reyes shot and killed this morning. he was 14 years old. police describe it as a gang-related murder. here's why. >> we've determined that the victim was with at least two known gang members early this morning when the murder occurred. >> was the victim involved in the gang? >> at this point we're still working to determine whether that's the case or not. >> reporter: the scene, sheridan street in louisdale. it was after midnight. police say reyes and some gang members were outside. that a van pulls up and then -- then gunfire. floyd bennett lives across the street. he was home when it happened. >> i heard five shots. sounded like a machine gun. then i went to the door, and then i heard the people screaming across the street. it w
organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover some things we are not going to see it coming inauguration in january because this time we do not have a change of power. as we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes. but nevertheless in the morning at inauguration when a president does the office come here is a 1961 dwight eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time, the incoming president that year, john f. kennedy and his wife jacqueline leaving the blair house getting ready for the big day. another thing that takes place on inauguration morning and this will happen is a religious service. when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago, just a half a block from where we were staying, there was this chu
president. george h.w. bush. >> it's a brutal job. >> they all leave broken. >> well, i mean, look at obama, he's not broken but his hair is graying. they visibly age before -- >> joe's not broken. >> but you know what, he refused to leave. remember? bill clinton still in the hanger four months later. >> they're broken when they leave, but then they rehabilitate themselves. i mean, even nixon. you couldn't leave more broken than dicks nixon. he becomes the sage of saddle river, having journalists at the dinner, rewriting history books. even nixon can come back. there is life after the presidency if you handle yourself. but history is like -- >> another reason this is so much fun and so important ultimately is remember the way the founders described -- i think it was washington described the senate as the saucer in which -- >> where the tea cools. >> right. >> that's what history is. and it takes our friend michael beschloss as a rule, you can't write about a president in full until 25 years after they leave office. >> yeah. >> and again and again that's true. >> let me ask you this. by the
is prologue, george, we may find out why he launched this massacre. but the answer will be deeply unsatisfying. >> no question about that. but a lot of investigation. dan, thanks very much. elizabeth? >> all right. >>> picking up with those investigations, george. new details are emerging this morning about 20-year-old adam lanza, who has been identified as the gunman. authorities are now interviewing his family and his friends in three different states, trying to piece together what may have pushed him over the edge. abc's brian ross joins me in the studio with the latest on that part of the story. good morning, brian. >> reporter: good morning, elizabeth. he was armed to the teeth with high-powered weapons, that authorities say were legally obtained by someone in his family. and in an hour, adam lanza went from obscurity to infamy. authorities overnight were questioning family members of the 20-year-old killer. a man believed to be adam's older brother, ryan, left a new jersey police station, as authorities sought to figure out what turned the youngest member of the lanza family into a madma
, covering this tragedy. and you watched it unfold through the day yesterday. >> we did. george, just when you thought the mass shootings, just when you thought they wouldn't get worse or more shocking, along comes adam lanza, who began his day by killing his mother, and ended it by storming that school. and of all the people he shot, there was only one survivor. 9:40 a.m., reports of gunfire at sandy hook elementary. >> sandy hook school. caller is indicating that she thinks there's a shooter in the building. >> reporter: adam lanza wore a bullet-proof vest and was carrying three semiautomatic weapons including a rifle. >> i felt a little sick. >> reporter: within five to ten minutes, the first s.w.a.t. teams arrive. >> i need units in the school. i got bodies here. >> reporter: officers helped teachers lead several hundred students to a nearby firestation. >> when the policemen came in to get us, he told us to close our eyes. and like on the picture on the news, do this. >> reporter: at 10:30 a.m., president obama was briefed on the situation, as police discovered a second crime scene. l
>> coming up come from coverage of the annual libertarian conference freedom fest, economist george gilder talks about the new edition of his 1981 best-selling book, "wealth and poverty." this is just over 30 minutes. >> george gilder, you have the new edition of "wealth and poverty" out. how is the country changed since the original "wealth and poverty" came out in the 1980s click >> it hasn't changed at all. we've got a new carter in office and president obama. most of the themes of "wealth and poverty" that sprung from the awful doldrums of the u.s. economy under jimmy carter apply stronger, more strongly today. >> house so click >> obama is the same kind of antibusiness president and insight president. same kind of managerial, interfering, strangling, surprising president jimmy carter was. >> you writing here about president obama. i want to get to the right page so i can quote it correctly, sir. you write under the obama administration that the u.s. had a morbid subversion of the infrastructures of its economy. the public sector has become a manipulative forest, aggressively in
of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugurations when a president does leave office, 1961, here is toyed d. eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the income then-president, that year john f. kennedy and his wife, there are leaving the blair house getting ready for the big day. another thing -- another thing that takes place on inauguration morning, and this will happen again coming is a religious service. when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago just half a block from where were saying there was this church
chaos in washington and a rough day in the financial markets. >>> and we switch gears, george, four days left to get your christmas presents. if you haven't done it yet, don't worry. we have incredible deals. >>> let's get right to the wild weather across the nation, creating trouble for holiday travel. our team is tracking it this morning, beginning with sam. good morning, sam. >> good morning, george. as the storm that terrorized the country, now that it's moved in the northeast, it is a big heavy rain situation with wind. we've had an inch of rain so far in the new york city area. another half-inch of rain coming. 45-mile-per-hour, 50-mile-per-hour winds. take a look at the damage that came in with the winds. four stories' worth of scaffolding collapsing. just one of the scaffolding collapses that we have seen in new york. "gma" storm site radar will show you there's plenty left in this storm, still plenty of rain from washington, d.c. to boston today. and plenty of snow in the back end behind it. we use this model to show us where the worst winds will be. what you need to look at is
will be the guest on "this week" with george stephanopoulos. george is with us now. good morning, george. >> last weekend, you sat right here and you said that you were reasonably optimistic that a deal could be afoot. in the intervening week, we have seen a lot of trash-talking from both sides, can we still be somewhat hopeful? >> this week was a rough week in these negotiations. treasury secretary geithner when he went up to capitol hill, on thursday, the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell laughed when he got the offer from tim geithner. they think it's an offer that doesn't show any rules towards compromise. house speaker john boehner said that the talks are at a stalemate. there seems to be a huge divide. democrats said they're not going to make another move until republicans clearly say they're going to go for an increase in tax rates. republicans aren't prepared to make a move. unless the democrats are able to give up greater savings in medicare. so, this is stalemate right now. now, these things always look horrible before they come together. more and more voices say, this is going t
of noise. they have gone to the george romney building and made the noise. that is all they can do is express discontent. they can look at legal remedies and look to the next election >>shepard: that is live from lansing. not one worker from europe's biggest bank, hsbc, will far us a criminal charge after they were accuses of failing to guard against terrorists, tax cheat and drug cartels but agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion fine to settle the case. that probably won't hurt this bank at all. last quarter, they reported $2.5 billion in net profit. according to the treasury, the failure to police transactions allowed hundreds of millions of dollars in drug money from mexican cartels to flow into the united states. the feds report the bank broke finance laws when they did business with iran and libya and cuba and others. under their deem with the feds, the bank will pay the record fine, change some policies, but not one bank employee will ever face criminal prosecution. the prosecutors say department of justice officials wanted to bring criminal charges but decided not to not becau
.m. >>> breaking news in prince george's county. police evacuate a neighborhood overnight when a man barricades himself in his apartment. we're live on the scene. good morning everyone. i'm aaron gilchrist. >> i'm eun yang. welcome to news4 today. it's 50 degrees. little bit of a wet start. let's check in with tom kierein with forecast. tom, hi. >> good morning. when you went to bed last night, you probably saw a lot fog in your neighborhood. it's pretty much gone. the winds have picked up sweeping the fog away. we've had overnight sprinkles too. they're gone now. as we look at the view from space, the satellite image showing a few clouds lingering over the metro area in parts of northern virginia and maryland. there are breaks in the clouds over the shenandoah vaey. parts of the northern neck. cloud cover there beginning to break up a little bit. temperatures right now around the metro area in fairfax, arlington, prince george's, arlington in the upper 40s. it's in the low 50s much of southern maryland around the bay and on the even shore and northern neck and farther west. from prince william
assure you. >> i loved it. >> i loved it, too. happy friday. george, robin, lara, all at home with their families today. great to have amy, paula and rachel with us this morning. >>> a big headline in the fiscal cliff showdown. now, just four days from heading over the edge. the meeting that could change it all today at the white house. jon karl is here with the very latest on that. >>> and then, we have a shocking headline this morning. teachers training to shoot guns on the job. using this holiday break to learn how to handle firearms. applications for these classes are up all across the country. we're going to talk much more about that in a bit. >>> we want to get right to the breaking news this morning. it affects so many americans hoping to adopt. the president of russia has just signed a bill, banning americans from adopting russian children. and this stops kids from being adopted by american families, leaving russia, to move here to start a new life. abc's lama hasan has the latest from london. good morning to you, lama. >> reporter: good morning to you, josh. this cont
about george moscone and harvey milk is the fact that they were not afraid to go against the mainstream. and i think that's something that often gets forgotten. and one thing that i want to say, especially when it comes to harvey milk and what he represents to me -- and i say this not only as a gay man, but as a gala -- gay latino man -- for me harvey milks legacy was not so much about lgbt rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends
vernon is the house george washington owned and had it expand. of course, because you lived on the potomac river he got to pick the sites of the nation's capital which is washington, d.c. mount vernon is probably the most significant building that's on the potomac historically. >> gary to come in your research for this, i'm guessing you spend sometime on on the river? >> i did. i spent about seven months on both sides. i went to several hundred sites to visit them, take all the hikes, trying to combine history with recreation. and also public accessibility. all sites that people can go to, and not just -- take a hike or jump on a canoe or kayak, have a good time on the river. it's an enormous recreation opportunity for washingtonians and people visiting the area. >> we are speaking with garrett peck things so much. >> thank you. i also have a sequel coming out which is called the smithsonian castle. >> great. thanks again. >> pulitzer prize-winning author william kennedy explores the political and cultural structure of albany in all albany -- all albany. booktv spoke to ms.
again. >>> one prince george's county teen may not have gotten a whole lot of sleep last night. she could make history tonight on the basketball court. jasmine hill will look to become the first woman ever to score 1,000 points. right now she has 996 points heading into tonight's game. she'll continue her hoops career next year at howard university. congrats to her. >> it's in the bag. she just has to make two shots. she can get it. >>> it's 40 degrees here at 4:37. ahead on "news 4 today," bringing the redskins home. the offer that could land the team back in the district. >>> and the video giving you an inside look at a tornado. ♪ [ female announcer ] at yoplait, we want you to feel even better about your favorite flavors. so when you call, tweet, and post, we listen. that's why yoplait light and yoplait original are now made with no high fructose corn syrup. and why we use only natural colors and natural flavors in yoplait original. so, anything else we can do for you, let us know. but you'll keep it to yogurt, right? 'cause we shouldn't really help with your love life. yoplait
. >>> newly released photo shows ray bloody george zimmerman on the night he shot and killed trayvon martin. does it boost his claim it was done in self-defense? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] while you're getting ready for the holidays, we're getting ready for you. tis the season. for food, for family, and now, something extra -- for you. >>> the internet security guru john mcafee is wanted for questioning in belize in the death of his neighbor. the strange tale began in early november, when mcafee said someone poisoned four of his dogs. dogs whose barking was apparently a source of tension between the two neighbors. two days after the dogs were poisoned, mcafee's neighbor was shot in the head. mcafee says he didn't kill him but that he's afraid for his own life and that authorities in belize are after him becaus
td ameritrade. >>> newly released photos shows a bloody george zimmerman on the night he shot and killed trayvon martin. north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> the internet security guru john mcafee is wanted for questioning in belize in the death of his neighbor. the strange tale began in early november, when mcafee said someone poisoned four of his dogs. dogs whose barking was apparently a source of tension between the two neighbors. two days after the dogs were poisoned, mcafee's neighbor was shot in the head. mcafee says he didn't kill him but that he's afraid for his own life and that authorities in belize are after him because he refused to pay a bribe to a politician. cnn's martin savidge was
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